Disability Insurance: Private Vs. Government

If you are injured in an accident or fall ill and are unable to work as a result, you're going to need payments from a disability insurer to replace as much of your lost income as possible. Two main types of insurance programs are involved in these situations: private companies and government programs. Here is a look at these two types of insurers and how they interact. SSDI The main government program for disability insurance that is not related to an injury on the job is the Social Security Disability Insurance program, typically called by its acronym, SSDI.   Read More...

5 Reasons You Need A Corporate Lawyer

As a corporation or big company, it's important that you always have your affairs in order. You need processes in place in case anything ever goes wrong. It's a good idea to hire a corporate lawyer as soon as you can so that you have one to represent you for any of your legal needs. Here are some of the reasons as to why you need a corporate lawyer:  Get Legal Guidance   Read More...

The Timeline For Settling Your Car Accident Case

One of the top things you might be wondering about your car accident case is how long you should expect it take before you settle and receive your check for the compensation you are entitled to. Unfortunately, there is no set answer for this question, as the answer will depend on many different factors. Here is a timeline of how a case is settled, and this may help you determine approximately how long it will take to settle your case.   Read More...

Understanding Social Security Disability Representative Payees

When a worker becomes too ill to work, they might apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). The amount provided by the Social Security Administration (SSA) allows those not able to work at their jobs with a small income to pay for the expenses of living. Unfortunately, some SSDI recipients are unable to properly deal with the financial benefits of SSDI. Read on to learn more about Social Security representative payees.   Read More...

Playing Your Bankruptcy Wildcard

If you are thinking about filing for bankruptcy, exemptions play a considerable role when it comes to keeping property. Every state allows chapter 7 bankruptcy filers to use a certain dollar amount to exempt property from seizure. Once a property is exempt, the bankruptcy trustee cannot take it from you to help pay off some of your debts. Most filers are so concerned about losing property that they may put off the financial relief they need for far too long.   Read More...